so-treu:

im just gonna put this here.

so-treu:

im just gonna put this here.

(via so-treu)

vul-va:

Welcome to neoliberal queer hell. 

vul-va:

Welcome to neoliberal queer hell. 

(Source: marxism-leninism-maoism, via sinidentidades)

haleighbaleighbee:

fashioninfographics:

How many times can you wear it between washes?
Via

Huh. I think this is the most important thing I’ve ever reblogged.

haleighbaleighbee:

fashioninfographics:

How many times can you wear it between washes?

Via

Huh. I think this is the most important thing I’ve ever reblogged.

(via howtobeterrell)

princessbrat7:

nov—-18th:

"I have never really understood exactly what a ‘liberal’ is, since I have heard ‘liberals’ express every conceivable opinion on every conceivable subject." — Assata Shakur

image

(via tayloralxndr)

"

There is a continuing debate about the politics and efficacy of trigger warnings within activist, social media and academic spaces. There are merits to the various arguments on all sides of this discussion. However, sometimes what is missed is the larger context from which trigger warnings emerged. In particular, this intervention emerged from the recognition by many of us in the anti-violence movement that we were building a movement that continued to structurally marginalize survivors by privatizing healing. We had built movements that were supposed to be led by bad-ass organizers who were “healed” and thus had their acts together. If we in fact did not have our act together, this was an indication that we had not healed sufficiently to be part of the movement. We built movements around an idealized image of who were supposed to be rather than the people we actually were. The result was that we created a gendered and capitalist split in how we organized. Healing was relegated to the “private” sphere and became unacknowledged labor that we had to do on our own with a therapist or a few friends. Once we were healed, then we were allowed to enter the public sphere of organizing. Of course, since we continued to have problems, we continued to destroy our own organizing efforts internally with no space to even talk about what was going on.

Indigenous organizer Heather Milton-Lightning once prophetically declared at an Indigenous Women’s Network gathering many years ago that our movements were shunning people who might have issues, such as substance abuse. She called on us all to embrace whoever wants to be part of our movements as they are rather than as who we think they should be. The challenge for us, she noted, is to build movement structures that take into account the reality of how personal and collective trauma has impacted all of us.

Thus, trigger warnings cannot be viewed in isolation. Rather, they are part of a larger complex of practices designed to de-privatize and collective healing. They came out of the recognition that we are not unaffected by the political and intellectual work that we do. These practices also recognized that the labor of healing has to be shared by all. Trigger warnings are one of many practices that insist that one does not have to be silent about one’s healing journey – that one’s healing can occupy public and collective spaces. And healing can only truly happen when we take collective responsibility for creating structures and practices that enable healing.

"

Andrea Smith, "Beyond the Pros and Cons of Trigger Warnings: Collectivizing Healing." (via nica-nopal)

(via queer-filam-artivism)

g-iggle:

jzammito:

me in Spanish class

spanish class

g-iggle:

jzammito:

me in Spanish class

spanish class

(Source: dvrkn, via queensoucouyant)

If you’re talking to me on the phone and you have a lot to say and I don’t have to say much I’m on tumblr

#qpoc block. #fuckpride. nighty night.

#qpoc block. #fuckpride. nighty night.

returnthegayze:

#NoHomonationalism Teach-In on Gay Imperialism by @DarkMatterRage (follow us to keep the conversation going)

For the rest of the tweets from the teach-in check out this storify

(via wherethequeerthingsare)